How to Develop a Personal Brand for Your Writing Career

Developing a personal brand for your writing career is vital. It creates a mark around your image that helps express yourself, expertise, and values. Your brand should clearly define your personality and the products or services you have to offer. In other words, personal branding is to influence and control how people perceive your professional image and career. However, it’s important to note that branding is a process that needs a lot of effort and a combination of strategies. Here are some of the best ways to achieve a successful personal brand for your writing career.

Find Your Style

As a writer, you need to keep in mind that there are a million other writers out there with the same idea as yours. Therefore, you need more effort to be at the top of the game. Meaning, you need to figure out a unique style that will differentiate you from the rest. Be sure to identify what makes you who you are and concentrate on your strengths. If you’re not sure of your strengths, feel free to ask your trusted friends for genuine opinions. Once you identify your area and style, make sure you read widely to become an expert on your specific niche. Remember that successful writers read and learn every day, and some of the best writers on earth have defined morals, characters as well as style.

Consider a Pen Name

Several writers have been using pen names for years now; they do so for a good reason. Some do it because their names are similar to other famous writers, so they don’t want to create confusion for readers. Or sometimes, a writer’s name may be complicated and hard to read, so they choose a pen name to attract readers. In other cases, some writers want to keep their writing career private, especially those specialized in sensitive areas such as politics. Therefore, if you strongly feel using a pen name could be a good idea, feel free to do so, regardless of your reasons.

Take Professional Photos

Many readers make decisions based on your first impression. Your professional photos tell half of your story. Casual and unappealing photos may put off potential readers. Therefore, investing in quality and appealing photos can have a positive impact on peoples’ perception of your brand. Additionally, make sure you contact a professional photographer with vast experience and knowledge about headshots. However, while your photographer will know how to get the best shots of you, you should practice posing techniques before taking your headshots.

Develop Your Professional Network

Networking is essential in building a successful personal brand. Just like any other professional needs networking to get a job, you also need to connect with relevant people within your industry to get noticed. You should always follow your favorite writers and even subscribe to their channel or buy their products. Be eager to create new relationships, both locally and internationally. These connections can be beneficial to your career in the future.

Create a Website

Developing a brand is the best way to make an online presence. You can use your name or a pen name to showcase your skills and experience in the industry. Remember that people will get to know you exist through your website. It also exposes you to potential employers and other people who may be interested in your products or services.

Building a personal brand for your writing career may not be as simple as it sounds. But it shouldn’t be difficult. All you need is to identify and set clear personal and professional objectives. This can help you know what to prioritize at any given time. The five tips mentioned above are some of the best to help build a successful personal brand in your writing career.

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